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Health Benefits of Potato

Potatoes were first cultivated in the South America Region around 7,000 to 10,000 years ago. They are the 4th largest food crop all over the world with one-third of the world’s potatoes being cultivated in China and India which helps explain the demand in both countries’ cuisines.


Potatoes are one of the vegetables that are loved by many because of their flavor and how easily they blend into different types of foods. Let us explore the hidden gems beyond the flavor of this tuber.

Gut-Friendly

They are rich in carbohydrates and fiber which facilitates smooth digestion making them good food for people who have a hard time digesting solid foods but requires plenty of energy.

Minimizes Inflammation

They are easy to digest and they hold a lot of Vitamin C for added protection again infection and diseases which is good for you and your children. Yams and sweet potatoes can also relieve inflammation in the digestive system and may ease the suffering in those with gout.

Rich in Carotenoids

Carotenoids help maintain your heart and other internal organs for healthy functioning. But always make sure to watch out in over-consuming potatoes as they can also raise your glucose levels. One way to combat this is by adding a good fat such as butter to those taters.

Skincare Potion

Potatoes are rich in Vitamin B and Vitamin C which supports healthy skin and a crushed potato pulp mixed with honey can be used as a skin mask. For people who are suffering from pimples or sunburn, apply a potato pulp on the affected area for faster healing.


We won’t end this article without a delicious and surely healthy potato recipe that you can serve for your friends or family!

RED POTATO, ASPARAGUS, & ARTICHOKE SALAD

Ingredients:

  • 18 small red potatoes
  • 3 pounds fresh asparagus, trimmed
  • 3 pounds fresh asparagus, trimmed
  • 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 cup olive oil
  • salt and ground black pepper to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
  • 5 tablespoons minced fresh chives

Instructions:

  1. Place the potatoes into a large pot and cover with salted water. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain and allow to steam dry for a minute or two. Allow to cool completely before cutting into bite-size cubes. Transfer to a large bowl.
  2. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Add the asparagus spears, and cook until tender, about 3 minutes depending on size. Drain and immediately plunge into cold water to stop cooking. Cut the asparagus spears into 1-inch pieces. Place in the bowl with the potatoes. Stir in the artichokes, breaking them apart slightly as you put them in the bowl.
  3. Combine the mustard and lemon juice in a bowl; whisk the oil gradually into the mustard and lemon juice until smooth. Season with salt, pepper, and cayenne pepper to taste. Drizzle over the vegetables; toss to coat. Sprinkle with chives to serve..

Adapted from: https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/65164/red-potato-asparagus-and-artichoke-salad/

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Staying Healthy This Holiday Season

The holidays are upon us and it is a time of family, friendship and celebration but can also be a time of stress for us with travel plans, interrupted schedules and falling out of sync with our routines.

Thanksgiving is one of the most awaited events of the year because it unifies all the people that we love the most at one bountiful table. The constant wave of laughter and culinary delicacies are the highlights of the day but when it comes to food, how much is too much? If you tune into your body and think that you’re already stuffed, and yet, you still want to have a pinch serving of each food to suffice your cravings; that’s a red flag. One way to distract yourself from overeating is to socialize and be more mindful during your meal. This year focus on feeding yourself not only with what’s served but also with stories and emotions.

Start off your day with a fresh fruit smoothie which will provide you with a boost in your metabolism and provide you with a lot of amazing and supportive nutrients. Take a stroll along the sidewalk or do some cycling to start your body and keep the blood flowing. A shot of apple cider mixed with water can also lift your digestion (you can add this to your daily routine as it can help your overall health). CHEW CHEW CHEW! Eat your food slowly. It will give you a lot more time to chat with your family and friends plus, you’re giving your tummy a way to easily digest, no one’s in a race here, so savor every bite. Last but not the least, do not consume too much food in one sitting.

Digestion plays a big part for us during this time because of the additional or different foods we may be eating so be sure to include fiber-enriched dishes at your table such as salads, beans, and veggies. After eating, do not lie down for 2 to 3 hours to avoid acid reflux or indigestion. Also, if you feel stuffed or bloated, drinking a cup of peppermint or chamomile tea can ease your discomfort. The next morning, get your body into the groove to invigorate your stomach and to burn calories; Eat foods that are high in fiber like carrots, nuts, and beans and drink plenty of water to support the body’s elimination processes.

Quick Tips for the Holidays

Plan time for exercise. Exercise helps relieve holiday stress and prevent weight gain. A moderate and daily increase in exercise can help partially offset increased holiday eating. Try 10- or 15-minute brisk walks twice a day.

• Don’t skip meals. Before leaving for a party, eat a light snack like raw vegetables or a piece of fruit to curb your appetite. You will be less tempted to over-indulge.

• Survey party buffets before filling your plate. Choose your favorite foods and skip your least favorite. Include vegetables and fruits to keep your plate balanced.

• Eat until you are satisfied, not stuffed. Savor your favorite holiday treats while eating small portions. Sit down, get comfortable, and enjoy.

• Be careful with beverages. Alcohol can lessen inhibitions and induce overeating; non-alcoholic beverages can be full of calories and sugar.

• If you overeat at one meal go light on the next. It takes 500 calories per day (or 3,500 calories per week) above your normal/maintenance consumption to gain one pound. It is impossible to gain weight from one piece of pie!

• Take the focus off food. Turn candy and cookie making time into non-edible projects like making wreaths, dough art decorations or a gingerbread house. Plan group activities with family and friends that aren’t all about food.

• Try serving a holiday meal to the community, playing games or going on a walking tour of decorated homes.

• Bring your own healthy dish to a holiday gathering.

And even if you fall of the wagon during the holidays there is always a new day to jump back on that wagon – If you need some additional support and assistance to get back on track my 28 Day Hormone Reset Detox may be just what you need after the holidays to get back on track!

Cherish this moment and keep the love alive. Here’s wishing you a happy Thanksgiving and holiday season!

Cheers!

Cranberry Sauce

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons melted coconut oil
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin purée (not pumpkin pie filling)
  • 3 tablespoons almond butter (or your favorite nut butter)
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Instructions:

  1. Mix all of the ingredients together in a saucepan over medium-high heat.
  2. Bring the sauce to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until the berries begin to break, or for about 20 minutes.
  3. Remove from heat and let it sit until it reaches room temperatures. The sauce will thicken as it cools.
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No Tricks – Healthy Halloween Treats

The hunt begins for a wickedly delicious and hauntingly healthy Halloween dessert this spooky festive season. The cascade of leaves from the branches of the hollow trees may be the start of our demise, but surprise! We are not going on that route because we will enjoy this holiday with an array of festive and flamboyant treats that will feast not only our eyes but also our guts and health!

Chocolate Pumpkin Cups

Less carving and more baking for pumpkin! A luscious chocolate cups that are flavored with festive ingredients which are maple and cinnamon for a spark of brilliance and excitement.

Ingredients:

Chocolate Layers

  • 1/2 cup melted coconut oil
  • 1/2 cup cacao powder
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup

Pumpkin Layer

  • 2 tablespoons melted coconut oil
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin purée (not pumpkin pie filling)
  • 3 tablespoons almond butter (or your favorite nut butter)
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Instructions:

  1. Line a muffin tin with cupcake liners.
  2. Combine all ingredients for the chocolate layer in a small bowl. Mix until well combined. I found that measuring out about 1/2 tablespoon (or a little less) into each cupcake liner was just enough to fill both chocolate layers. These layers are very thin! I made 10 chocolate cups. You may have to spread out the chocolate so it fills the whole liner. Freeze for 15 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, prepare the pumpkin layer. Combine all ingredients for the pumpkin layer in a small bowl. Mix until well combined. I measured out about 1 tablespoon for each cup. Layer over the chocolate and freeze for 20 minutes or until firm.
  4. Finish by layering the leftover chocolate over the pumpkin layer and freeze for an hour or until firm.
  5. Transfer cups to a sealed container and store in the freezer.

Adapted From: The Glowing Fridge

Candy Skull Crushers

Let’s take the spooky level a little further by creating a field of creepy mini happy skulls. They are an amazing nibs of healthy treat that you can share with the children and will surely put a smile on their faces.

Ingredients:

Equipment/Materials

  • A blender / food processor
  • A candy mold or ice cube tray

For the “white chocolate” coating

  • 1/2 cup coconut oil
  • 1/2 cup cashew nuts
  • 1 tbsp raw honey
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tbsp raw almond milk

For the berry filling

  • 1/4 cup goji berries
  • 1/4 cup fresh blackberries (can be substituted with other berries)
  • 1/4 cup cashew nuts
  • 2 tbsp raw almond milk or milk of choice
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Instructions:

  1. To make the “white chocolate” coating, mix all ingredients in a blender or food processor until completely smooth. Add a tiny bit more milk if it’s hard to blend.
  2. Make the berry filling by separately mixing all ingredients in a blender or food processor until smooth and resembles a thick sauce.
  3. Fill your mold up to about 1/3 way with the white chocolate and freeze for a few minutes. (Should only take about 10 minutes for it to firm up.)
  4. Then spoon in about 1/2 tsp full of the berry filling, keeping it in the center of the mold. And freeze for a further 10 minutes.
  5. Now fill up to the top with the white chocolate and freeze or refrigerate to set for at least 30 minutes.
  6. Keep in the fridge or freezer so it will keep a nice solid texture. Will be fine at room temperature for about 15 minutes before it softens.

Adapted From: Wallflower and Kitchen

Be creative and go EXTRA as much as you want because after all this season is meant to celebrate the characters that made us feel happy, surprised, inspired, and confident.

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Health Benefits of Apple

Glorified as the food that keeps the doctor away, apple is a staple fruit for every American household. The abundance of apples can be found all year round and it is one of the most cultivated fruit. Because of that, it has been produced in different forms such as juices, purees, and fruit cocktails. The real question is, does its Welsh proverbial quotation live up to the benefits for our bodies? Together, let’s find out!

Stronger Guts

In order to keep the good bacteria that support your digestion healthy, feeding them with a type of fiber called pectin keeps them in nourished and that type of compound can be found in apple. 

Excellent for your Brain

Some might doubt that apple juice may have fewer health benefits than eating the whole fruit but to debunk that notion, apple juice has the ability to preserve acetylcholine which is a neurotransmitter which can decline through aging and lower level of acetylcholine is associated to Alzheimer’s disease.  Just keep your juice intake to a maximum of a few ounces at a time because of the high sugar content.

Rich in Antioxidants

Apple is packed with Vitamin C which acts as an anti-inflammatory and immunity booster, and it also keeps your skin healthy and smooth. This fruit is also loaded with Polyphenols that regulate digestion, prevent and improve the condition of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

We also have a delicious and truly delectable apple recipe for all of you. Check it out and enjoy this snack with your friends and family!

SPICED APPLE MUFFINS

Dry Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup of coconut flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon medium grind sea salt (if you use fine, use 1/4 teaspoon)
  • 3/4 cup of shredded apples (wash, and core the apples, and then shred, peel and all)
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

Wet Ingredients:

  • 1/3 cup of coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup of honey
  • 3 large eggs

Instructions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Prep the muffin tins or the baking cups.
  2. In a medium-size bowl combine the dry ingredient and briskly whisk until all lumps are removed.
  3. Add coconut oil and honey.
  4.   Melt together on the stove-top, just until melted (don’t get it hot, otherwise, it could cook your eggs prematurely).
  5. Add the eggs while lightly whisking the mixture. Whisk until everything is well combined, and then add the shredded apples.
  6. Divide between ten muffin tins, and bake for about 25 minutes or until the tops are lightly browned and a toothpick comes out clean when poked in the middle of the muffin.
  7. Allow to cool for a few minutes and take out of the muffin tins and serve!
  • Add a bit of lemon juice or vinegar and baking soda in place of the baking powder to make these Gaps Friendly.

Adapted from: https://www.thenourishinggourmet.com/2009/09/spiced-apple-muffins-gluten-grain-and-dairy-free.html

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Turkey Zoodles Recipe – Paleo, Gluten Free

Can I tell you that I LOVE LOVE LOVE this recipe!  It’s super fresh, fast, healthy, detox friendly, paleo and gluten free.  What’s not to love?!?  This is a dish even YOUR KIDS are going to eat.  My dog Brie enjoys any leftover zoodles!

This is a 20 minute one pan dish if you follow my preparation and kitchen tool techniques and I especially enjoy it during the summer.  I keep the zucchini cold and cover the cold zoodles with the heat meat, veggie, sauce combo and it becomes a fresh summer dish for these hot hot hot Southern summer days.

You can also substitute grass fed beef for the organic turkey if you wish.

In this recipe I use a jar of marinara in order to save time for those quick weekday meals.  When choosing your sauce choose one without any added sugars and I always buy one that has the least amount of sugar/carbs listed on the label.  Some fantastic brands are: Organico Bello, Cucina Antica,  

Also, be sure to have your tools on hand to make your life EASIER – Two kitchen items I cannot live without is my garlic roller/peeler – seriously if you don’t have one of these you need one. I can peel my garlic in 3 seconds flat with this bad boy.  Also you’ll want a spiralizer to make those yummy zoodles. With this tool I can zoodle a zucchini in about 20 seconds.  Dinner in 20 minutes? BOOM!

Here’s to healthy quick meals!

Italian Turkey Zoodles

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 medium zucchini – spiralized
  • 1 lb organic ground turkey
  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • One medium onion – diced
  • 8 oz mushrooms – diced
  • 3 cloves garlic – peeled and minced
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp crushed red pepper (optional)
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 1 24oz jar of no sugar added marinara sauce
  • Fresh basil chopped

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Spiralize your zucchini and put the spiralized zucchini on a paper towel to drain while you prepare the rest of the meal.
  2. In a large nonstick skillet heat 2 teaspoons olive oil over medium heat.
  3. Add organic turkey, onion, mushrooms and garlic and cook until turkey is no longer pink and vegetables are tender; breaking up turkey into crumbles, 8-10 minutes; drain.
  4. Put pan back on the burner and turn the heat down to a simmer
  5. Add your marinara sauce – I usually use ¾ of a jar – just depends on how wet you want your dish.
  6. Stir in your spices.
  7. Let the pan simmer until all ingredients are well mixed and warm.
  8. Place a cup of spiralized zucchini on your plate, spoon your turkey, veggie, sauce mixture over the zucchini.  Garnish with chopped basil.
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Healthy Back to School Lunches

Happy Fall!  It’s that time of year when summer festivities are winding down and we all regain a more routine schedule even if we do not have children that are heading back to school.  Your nervous system as well as your brain requires whole food fuel – specifically fat and B vitamins in order to thrive.  If fatigue, memory, or mood are issues for you or your child, be sure to check out my easy tips to improve your health and probably your grades too!

  • Avoid refined sugar, genetically modified grains, poor quality dairy products and other highly processed foods like poor quality lunch meat. The foods on this list will have an array of negative health effects ranging from brain fog, fatigue and inflammation from sugary or processed GMO grains, to digestive upset from dairy products or poorly processed meat. To make sandwiches, replace your store bought bread with better ingredients like Bob’s Red Mill flours or make a lettuce wrap instead! Replace your lunch meats with a healthy meat like grilled chicken or a nitrate and preservative free brand. Buy and cook your own meat from a market or local farm where animals are raised in healthy and grass fed or pasture raised conditions. Cook your roast or breast and then slice it thin for your own, healthy lunch style meat.

  • Eat foods for function! Foods that help sharpen your focus include a side of celery, sliced peppers, or carrots. These great veggies provide your body with Luteolin which helps to reduce inflammation and improve memory.

  • Don’t forget your B vitamins! Packing a side of steamed broccoli and cauliflower, eating eggs for breakfast, and packing a healthy meat can all provide a healthy source of Choline which can assist with brain development, boost cognitive function and improve learning and memory! Eggs, beef, and fish will also give your brain a B12 boost and help with memory!

  • Blueberries are a good option for fun finger fruits. Blueberries are rich in antioxidants and phytochemicals that improve learning, thinking and memory. If you or your child are a “hand-to-mouth snacker” – eating blueberries, one at a time, and thoroughly enjoying them may be a good side for your lunch! Add almonds for additional vitamin B and an enjoyable crunch!

  • Walnuts and pumpkin seeds provide an easily packed snack that is high in Omega 3’s which are good for the brain and memory.

  • Get to BED! No one will function well, have clear memory, feel energized, or be in a good mood if he/she is lacking the proper rest. Be sure that everyone in your household gets the appropriate number of sleep hours each night. Infants are recommended to have 16 hours; teenagers are recommended to have 9 hours; and adults are recommended to have 7 to 8 hours.

  • Finally, remember that vitamin D is important for the brain function and to combat stress. Ask your practitioner if you are consuming adequate vitamin D or if it needs to be supplemented throughout the winter. Vitamin D has also been linked to stronger immune systems which is always helpful with back to school!  Cod Liver Oil is one of my favorite and efficient ways to obtain Vitamin D for the body!

Dr. Stephanie Zgraggen, DC, MS, CCN, CNS is a licensed chiropractic physician, certified clinical nutritionist, and owner of Lime and Lotus, LLC.  Dr. Zgraggen has developed a successful method for determining the root causes of many of her patient’s health concerns, and she uses a combination of whole food and herbal protocols to restore health.

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Tame Your Thirst with these Easy Steps

Water is essential, universal, and 60% of the adult body is made up of it, which is why it is important to drink lots of water every day. It also protects your brain and internal tissues and lubricates your joints for better movement. Not drinking enough water can affect your overall health. Observe the color of your urine, if it is amber, then that means you are not getting enough water. If it’s the color of straw, then you’re good to go!

Remembering to drink water can be difficult because we live in a fast-paced and overbooked environment, especially when we are at work, and there are more tempting foods that we prefer over water such as soda, juices, energy drinks, and coffees. So, juggling these two things at the same time makes water less of a priority which is alarming.

Here are a few smart ways to remind yourself of drinking more water during this summer heat wave!

Add it to your everyday routine

Jumpstart your day with a glass of water and don’t just stop there, include a glass of water before or every after your daily regimen. Incorporating these routines will allow you to trick yourself into drinking more water and the best thing about this is, you wouldn’t even know that you have already achieved the required number of glasses a day!

Mark your water jug with time-oriented goals

Buying yourself a water bottle is the best way to never forget yourself from drinking water. Create your own drinking goals by marking your water bottle with the amount of water that you need to drink at a certain time. There are even bottles with time markers on them to help you out!

Through this, you’ll be more motivated to drink water because it would be like a game of track and field and those time you labeled are the laps. Buy a high-quality water bottle or if you want an eye candy, buy those with fancy designs but do not compromise the quality of it.

Ring the alarm!

Still can’t remember drinking your water? Schedule a few alarms on your phone and buzz it with your favorite song! Don’t go for the regular annoying alarm tone. Setting it with a great song will motivate you to hydrate more.

Munch your water

There are plenty of foods that are rich in water and their water content may not be enough to suffice your daily water needs but eating these foods can help you fill in those gaps that you missed. You can eat them as a snack in between your breaks and these foods include strawberries, watermelon, cherries, grapes, apricots, zucchinis, lettuce, cucumber, and more!

Level up your water experience

If drinking plain water is too bland for your taste, you can boost its flavor without adding a spoonful of sugar. Drop a few cucumber slices or add some ice cubes with frozen lemon slices into your water bottle for a splash of zing! If you want more spice, you can opt for herbs or ginger, or you can combine both. We also love the experience of sparkling water to add a little bubbly to your life!

Go the EXTRA mile by using a fun or crazy straw! We love using stainless steel and bamboo ones that can be reused over and over again. The great about using a straw is that it’ll trick your mind to sip and sip without realizing that you have already drunk a generous expanse of water.

Water can exactly change your life, and whatever activities you’ll do just to remind yourself to drink more water, do it because, at the end of the day, it’s all about you facing life with good health and feeling better!

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Welcome to the Summer of Education

Let’s use this summer to learn more about our bodies, our health and easy ways to improve them both!

Welcome to the summer of education – So many of my patients and followers ask for resources and education to learn how to empower themselves and take charge of their own health. So I thought I’d take this summer to introduce you to some of my favorite reading and resources. I’ll even be starting a monthly book club where we can read a book as a group and start some lively discussions!

My first block of resources is focused on the Standard American Diet, how we botched it up, how to get back in check with what we’re eating/growing/producing and the drug companies that are making a fortune off of our misfortune.

Check out the list and see if any resonate with you to check out – If you’ve already read a few on the list let me know in the comments or comment on which one you’re going to read (you know for accountability 😉

Cheers –


2019 Summer Reading List
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Got Veggies?

Grow your own, grab some at your local Farmer’s Market, Local CSA Farm or even the Organic Produce section

 As the farmer’s markets are getting into full swing and everyone gets their gardens planted, this is a great time to talk about adding more veggies into our diets. I know, sometimes you get sick of hearing ‘eat more vegetables’ but without them you’d end up sick and we definitely don’t want that. The reason it’s so often repeated is simple–they pack a nutritional punch. A variety of vegetables in your diet will ensure adequate fiber (while skipping the grains) which keeps you feeling full (and less prone to snack on the bad stuff.) And, of course you know about all the vitamins and minerals, but did you know there’s a whole bunch of veggies that give you protein too?   Kale, for example.

But in case you need further motivation to ‘go green’ ,  cruciferous veggies like broccoli, kale, bok choy and cabbage also supply important nutrients the liver needs to help clean toxins out of the body.  Garlic is also detoxifying to the liver and the kidneys, plus it’s great for heart and circulatory health.

 When it comes your food – you are what you eat and quality does matter! Homegrown and local, farm grown is best. Even if your local farmer is not certified organic you can usually ask the farmer how it was grown and if he uses herbicides, pesticides or chemical fertilizers.  You’ll often find small, local farmers have higher quality and freshness standards than certified ‘organic’ produce at your grocery store but the USDA certification is just too costly for him (or her.) Get to know your farmer…and your food. Your health will thank you for it. 

But, however you do it, getting more vegetables into your daily diet is essential to good health. Salads for lunch are a good start. But challenge yourself to find more ways to sneak them in. My favorite breakfast is eggs with sauteed spinach. In the summer, we put vegetables on the grill in a saute pan or skewer them as kabobs.The addition of more greens (and yellows, reds, oranges, even purples) into your diet will guarantee better results with your health improvement program, and you may be pleasantly surprised at how much you actually enjoy them!!

Here’s to Healthy Noshing this Summer…

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Why YOU Need a Detox this Spring

Toxins are everywhere

You are exposed to toxins Every. Single. Day. There are approximately 80,000 chemicals registered for use in the U.S., and 800,000,000+ pounds of herbicides are used yearly on our crops. 1-3 The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that hundreds of these chemicals are present in our bodies. Research shows that certain chemicals may affect our immune, endocrine, nervous, and reproductive systems.

In fact, your body produces its own toxins, or waste known as endogenous toxins, simply by functioning. Your body also encounters external (exogenous) toxins, or chemicals made outside of your body. They are in the air you breathe, the food you eat, the water you drink, and the products you touch.4,5  

External Toxins

  • Air and Water Pollutants
  • Cigarette Smoke
  • Certain Personal Care Products
  • Dyes and Paints
  • Heavy Metals
  • Household Cleaning Products
  • Pesticides and Insecticides
  • Preservatives and Additives
  • Trans Fats

Internal Toxins

  • Ammonia
  • Carbon dioxide
  • Free radicals

You become what you eat

The typical America diet favors processed foods that tend to be high in refined sugar, trans fats, and salt.  Processed foods often contain pesticides, artificial ingredients, and genetically modified organisms that can contribute to toxin build up in the body.6  Exposure to these toxins can overburden your system’s natural ability to detoxify.

Reducing your toxic burden can reduce your odds of asthma, cancer, Alzheimer’s, infertility, hormonal and period problems and so much more. Reducing your toxic load can help you lose weight, restore your energy levels and balance your hormones. It can help you conceive a healthy baby and raise a healthy child.

When the body is overloaded with toxins, these toxins cannot be eliminated from the body and they slow down cellular function. This translates to decreasing your body’s function; the brain won’t fire as quickly so you become foggy and forgetful. This can mean you gain weight or feel tired and/or unmotivated.  Many people experience symptoms of toxicity but don’t recognize what these signs really can mean.  How many of the symptoms below do you have?

Symptoms of Toxin Exposure

  • Fatigue or difficulty sleeping
  • Indigestion and other gastrointestinal upset
  • Food cravings and weight gain
  • Reduced mental clarity (brain fog)
  • Low libido
  • Skin issues – eczema, acne, dark circles under the eyes
  • Joint or muscle pain
  • Headaches
  • Female hormone disturbances
  • Sinus issues
  • Water retention
  • Bad breath
  • Insomnia

Your Organs of Detoxification

My 28 day Reset Detox Programs are designed to stimulate specific detoxification organs in the body—the liver, kidneys, and intestines. With help from these organs, your toxic load can decrease, and your body can concentrate its energy on detoxifying and cleaning up. This can help you achieve optimal health by cleansing your body from the inside out.  The goal is to learn how to enhance your body’s ability to detox and remove these toxins on a daily basis. No matter where start, everyone can benefit from a detox program.

Liver

  • Filters toxins
  • Aids the body in metabolizing fat, protein, and carbohydrates
  • Helps transform many toxins into harmless agents

Kidneys

  • Filter waste and excess fluid from the blood
  • Regulate and release the right balance of sodium, phosphorus, and
    potassium for the body to function properly

Small Intestine

  • Digests food so that nutrients can be absorbed into the blood and transported to the liver
  • Provides a barrier that blocks toxins from the rest of the body

Large Intestine

  • Absorbs water and electrolytes, forming waste that is excreted from      the body
  • Produces antibodies for gastrointestinal health
  • Contains bacteria that create fatty acids and some vitamins for extra nutritional support

Why you may not be losing weight

If your body can’t release toxins through your intestines (poop) or kidney (urine) then they can be deposited and stored in the body.  Over months, years, or even decades these can build up in the body and create havoc.

One of the most common sites for us to deposit toxins is in our fat cells since many of the chemicals in today’s environment and food are lipotrophic, meaning that they LOVE FAT.  The challenge is that we have to release those stored toxins from the fat cells before the fat cells can shrink.  This is one reason why you may have been eating better and working out more but still seeing NO weight loss results. 

Where We Store Toxins

  • Fat Cells
  • Bone Marrow
  • Joints
  • Liver
  • Blood
  • Muscle
  • Central Nervous System

What the heck is metabolic detoxification anyway?

Metabolic detoxification is your body’s natural process of neutralizing and eliminating toxins from your body.  This three-phase process unlocks fat-soluble toxins and converts them to a water-soluble state that is easier for your body to remove. Your body needs key nutrients and phytonutrients to support each of these phases.

Three phases of metabolic detoxification

  • Phase I: Unlock – Stored fat-soluble toxins transform into an “unlocked” state that is more water-soluble, and in many cases, more toxic than its original form.  The foods and supplements recommended in the 28 day Reset Detox programs deliver nutrients that activate enzymes required for Phase I reactions. It also supplies antioxidants that reduce stress on your body, such as tissue damage sometimes caused by these enzyme activities.
  • Phase II: Neutralize – The highly toxic substances produced in Phase I convert to non-toxic molecules and become even more water-soluble. The foods and supplements recommended in the 28 day Reset Detox programs supply key nutrients and amino acids needed to support Phase II enzymes. These enzymes enhance the water solubility of toxins.
  • Phase III: Eliminate – Water-soluble toxins leave your cells, and your body eliminates them. The foods and supplements recommended in the 28 Day Reset Detox programs provide your body with plant-based fiber and water, which aid in toxin elimination.

A Simple, Effective Answer is HERE!

You can create more efficiency around detoxification by modifying your daily food choices, and habits to support your body’s natural ability to detoxify.  If you are experiencing any of the symptoms listed above or feel like it’s just time for a reset, I encourage you to check out my signature 28 Day Reset Programs.  The 28 Day Hormone Reset Detox is designed for balancing hormones and the 28 Day Autoimmune Reset Detox is specially created for those with autoimmune issues.

My hope is to provide you with easy, effective tools to help you liver YOUR. BEST. LIFE.

Cheers,

Author:

Dr. Stephanie Zgraggen, DC, MS, CNS, CCN is a licensed chiropractor, certified clinical nutritionist, and owner of Lime and Lotus, LLC in Charleston, South Carolina.  She utilizes saliva testing, herbs, and whole food supplements to correct female hormones imbalances in her patients.  Download her free guide: Dr. Stephanie’s Naughty List – The Top Five Foods that Wreck Your Hormone Health here

References:

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  2. Arthur Grube, David Donaldson, Timothy Kiely, and La Wu, “Pesticides Industry Sales and Usage 2006 and 2007 Market Estimates,” Washington, D.C.: United States Environmental Protection Agency, February 2011, PDF e-book, http://www.epa.gov/sites/production/iles/2015-10/documents/market_estimates2007.pdf.
  3. Michael N. Antoniou et al., “Concerns Over Use of Glyphosate-Based Herbicides and Risks Associated with Exposures: a Consensus Statement.” Environmental Health 15, no. 1 (2016): 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12940-016-0117-0.
  4. Romilly E. Hodges and Deanna M. Minich, “Modulation of Metabolic Detoxification Pathways Using Foods and Food-Derived Components: A Scientific Review with Clinical Application,” Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism (2015): 16. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/760689.
  5. Joseph W. Thornton, Michael McCally, and Jane Houlihan, “Biomonitoring of Industrial Pollutants: Health and Policy Implications of the Chemical Body Burden,” Public Health Reports 117, no. 4 (2002): 315-23, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1497458/pdf/12477912.pdf.
  6. Ian A. Myles, “Fast Food Fever: Reviewing the Impacts of the Western Diet on Immunity,” Nutrition Journal 13 (2014): 1. https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2891-13-61.